TPDULL 2014 Abstracts


Full Papers
Paper Nr: 1
Title:

Forceplates Data Reliability Tested on Children with Neuromuscular Disabilities

Authors:

Sarah Rosen, Carole A. Tucker and Rahamim Seliktar

Abstract: The “gait cycle” is considered the fundamental repetitive element of locomotion and is often used in comparative analyses between pathological and normal gait. One device that is used to measure ground reaction forces in the gait laboratory is a six degrees of freedom force transducer (“Force Plate”). Gait labs use two or more force plates to measure forces during one or two complete strides. Often, the walker “aims” to step sequentially on the force plates. This aiming may cause significant distortion of the person’s gait pattern. To validate the measured result as representative of the individual’s gait, a “Gait Consistency Test” was developed by Seliktar et.al with a group of adult individuals. The present study employed the consistency test to the ground reaction force records of two groups of children; typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy. The children’s gait consistency study yielded even better results than the adult study; the results showed that the consistency test is useful for screening children’s gait data and should be used to ensure higher fidelity of the measured data. The test applied equally to normally developing children and to children with gait pathologies.

Paper Nr: 2
Title:

TheraDrive in a Robot Gym - Toward Stroke Rehabilitation beyond Inpatient Rehabilitation Settings in USA and Mexico

Authors:

Michelle J. Johnson, Sandra Montes and Karla Bustamante

Abstract: Affordable stroke rehabilitation approaches can maximize the functional independence of stroke survivors discharged after inpatient and outpatient services and improve access to rehabilitation for low-resource environments. This paper briefly describes the evolution of the Theradrive system and its novel use in a robot therapy gym in Mexico, where it was one of 6 devices aimed at improve motor function after stroke. Results from testing with TheraDrive in Mexico in a robot gym suggest it is an effective affordable solution for upper limb stroke rehabilitation whether alone or in a suite with other devices.

Paper Nr: 3
Title:

PIPSS - A Portable Instrument Postural Stability System to Assess Dynamic Postural Stability

Authors:

Michael Korostelev, Li Bai, Assaf Zoor and Carole A. Tucker

Abstract: The most common method to assess postural stability involves the use of a force plate to measure changes in center of pressure (COP)(Duarte et al 2010). The high cost of this technology limits practicality and accessibility for widespread use outside of major clinical centers. There is an emerging trend toward video game use as a means of increasing patient engagement in rehabilitation interventions. This trend is primarily driven by the newest generation of consumer console systems which use motion-based controls (e.g. Nintendo Wii and WiiFit). We have developed and tested PIPSS, a system that utilizes the Nintendo Wii balance board to quantify COP during simple static and more complex dynamic balance tasks. This low cost, accessible postural stability assessment system could be easily deployed in clinics, sport and athletic centers, training rooms, schools or elderly care facilities to provide a quantitative metric of postural control. Such information would allow for more timely assessment and intervention, improved return to play guidelines in athletes, or balance and fall interventions in care centers for the elderly. Current work includes analyses and interpretation of the PIPSS testing protocols with existing balance measures in children and adults with Cerebral Palsy, and concussion.

Paper Nr: 5
Title:

Development and Testing of a Modular Upper Extremity Exoskeleton for Infants

Authors:

Tariq Rahman, Cole Galloway, Elena Kokkoni and Michele Lobo

Abstract: A passive upper extremity exoskeleton has been developed for people with neuromuscular weakness. The WREX (Wilmington Robotic EXoskeleton) has been used successfully for a number of years by people with disabilities such as muscular dystrophy and arthrogryposis. This paper describes the modification of the WREX to be fitted with infants. The Pediatric WREX Plus (P-WREX+) can selectively assist or resist antigravity arm movements based on the needs of each individual. It consists of a 3-D printed device that can be mounted to a jacket or a chair and allows infants more access to their environment by augmenting anti-gravity arm movement. The target population is infants born with brain injuries and at high risk for significant neuro-motor impairments. The paper describes the development of the device and testing with an infant with arthrogryposis over a 6-month period.

Short Papers
Paper Nr: 4
Title:

A Contribution to Motorized Rehabilitation Devices

Authors:

Alena Galajdova, Dusan Simsik, Boris Jobbagy and Marián Veselíny

Abstract: One of the most critical situations in life of seniors is a fall. Paper describes an experience of authors from the development of a special rehabilitation tool for training of seniors who are in higher risk of falls. Rehabilitation shoe SMILING is output of the international project supported by the European Commission. Authors shortly describe the mechanical design of the motorised rehabilitation device controlled by a chaotic signal. Paper is focusing on some results from the experimental work during clinical testing of the prototype in Slovakia.

Paper Nr: 7
Title:

Automated System for Balance Error Scoring

Authors:

Paarth Dave, Iyad Obeid and Carole Tucker

Abstract: The Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) test is a commonly used tool for assessing static postural stability after concussion that quantifies compensatory arm, eye and trunk movements. However, since it is scored by clinician observation, it is potentially susceptible to biased and inaccurate test scores. It is further limited by the need for properly trained clinicians to simultaneously administer, score and interpret the test. Such personnel may not always be available when concussion testing is needed such as at amateur sporting events or in military field situations. In response, we are creating a system to automatically administer and score the BESS in field conditions. The system is based on the Microsoft Kinect, which is an inexpensive commodity motion capture system originally developed for gaming applications. The Kinect can be interfaced to a custom-programmed laptop computer in order to quantitatively measure patient posture compensations for preventing balance loss such as degree of hip abduction/flexion, heel lift, eye opening, and hand movement. By (a) removing the need for an adequately trained clinician, (b) improving accuracy, and (c) using rugged off-the-shelf system components, it will be possible to administer better, more accurate concussion assessments outside of standard clinical settings.